Monday, February 19, 2007

Vergil Journal 4: Impressions of Carthage

9 comments:

Claire said...

Sorry, no Vergil journal to post because I hand wrote it (ghetto, I know). Just wanted to say that I am extremely impressed with you gals (Mia, Karen, and Julia) and will be posting here often! Vale.

Tyler said...

You girls have waaaaaaaaaaay too much time on your hands. Anyways maybe sometime after I actually bother learning some Latin and writing a worthwhile blog I'll post it on here, I'm actually considering learning some latin tonight though... Historic moment!

Tyler said...
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Claire said...
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Tyler said...
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Tyler said...
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Master Jung said...

why the heck are you people wasting the reading space?

Tyler said...

what kind of administrator deletes all these comments?

Master Jung said...

... I'm bored, so I'm going to type my Vergil Journal hahaha

Aeneas's impression of Carthage resembles a combination of both owe and at the same time, sorrow. Although Vergil explicitly says that "he was amazed by the sheer size" and other expressions to show that Aeneas is amazed by the size and quality of the city being built, but it seems that Aeneas definitely feels sorrow for his current status of not having built a city yet. Vergil describes this by using the quote: "So lucky it is for the ones whose walls already rise!"
From the description of different buildings being built, it even seems that Vergil is using the description of Carthage as the model of Rome itself. Carthaginians are building temples, walls, and theaters, which are all important buildings in Rome (at Vergil's times, of course.) From how people work diligently and how they follow the orders given by Dido, it can be reasonably inferred that Vergil intended the Carthaginians to be seen as a powerful race which works as hard as the Romans. From their apparent work ethic and their actions, Vergil may be honoring the Carthaginians as the worthy opponent and rival of Roman Republic. By giving a great deal of credit to Rome's greatest enemy in history, Vergil dignifies Rome greatly. Vergil also uses some sensory details to portray Aeneas as a character truly longing for his city and his destiny. Aeneas shows his longing for Italian kingdom shown with his arrival of Carthage is setting up for the tragedy of his relationship with Dido.